In Spain tourist information

Spain information to make your holidays easier.

 IN-Spain Travel Guide: Regions of Spain | Tourism in Spain | Routes by Spain | Golf in Spain | Weather in Spain

SITE INDEX
 
Province Info
  Andalucia Info
  Aragon Info
  Asturias Info
  Balearic Islands
  Basque Country
  Canary Islands
  Cantabria Info
  Castile-La-Mancha
  Castile and Leon
  Catalonia Info
  Extremadura Info
  Galicia Info
  La Rioja Info
  Madrid Info
  Murcia Info
  Navarre Info
  Valencia Info
malagacar

Cadiz City


Cadiz stands on a peninsula jutting out into a bay, and is almost entirely surrounded by water. Named Gadir by the Phoencians, who founded their trading post in 1100 BC, it was later controlled by the Carthaginians, until it became a thriving Roman port. It sank into oblivion under the Visigoths and Moors, but attained great splendour in the early 16th century as a launching point for the journey to the newly discovered lands of America. Cadiz was later raided by Sir Francis Drake, in the struggle to gain control of trade with the New World, and managed to withstand a siege by Napoleon's army. In the early 19th century Cadiz became the bastion of Spain's anti-monarchist, liberal movement, as a result of which the country's first Constitution was declared here in 1812.
  Some of the city's 18th century walls still stand, such as the Landward Gate. The old, central quarter of Cadiz is famous for its picturesque charm, and many of the buildings reflect the city's overseas links. Worth a visit are the city's Cathedral and churches of Santa Cruz and San Felipe Neri, which is famous throughout Spain as the place where, in defiance of Napoleon's siege, the provisional government was set up with its own liberal Constitution.
Other points of interest are La Santa Cueva, home to several paintings by Goya, and stately mansions such as the Casa del Almirante and Casa de las Cadenas.. The old city looks quite Moorish in apperaance and is intriguing with narrow cobbled streets opening onto small squares. The golden cupola of the cathedral looms high above long white houses and the whole place has a slightly dilapidated air. It just takes an hour to walk around the headlands where you can visit the entire old town and pass through some lovely parks with sweeping views of the bay.
Unlike most other ports of its size it seems immediately relaxed and easy going, not at all threatening, even at night. Perhaps this is due to its reassuring shape and size, the presence of the sea making it impossible to get lost for more than a few blocks. It also owes much to the town's tradition of liberalism and tolerance which was maintained all through the years of Franco's dictatorship, despite this being one of the first cities to fall to his forces and was the port through which the Republican armies launched their invasion.


Cadiz guide

Cadiz Information
Cádiz Beaches
Cádiz City
Cadiz Gastronomy
Cadiz Hotels
Cadiz Monuments
Cadiz Museums
Cadiz Natural Reserves
Cadiz golf information
Cadiz weather
Cadiz street map
Cadiz Map

Conil street map
Ubrique street map

Jerez street map
Paterna street map



 

   All content © 2013 in-spain.net All Rights Reserved